Nude Turkey Guy (Primed for Stuffing!) Headlines Bizarre Ads for PRISM+

MullenLowe's approach is all about immersion

Are you into cooking shows, live concerts and hardboiled crime dramas? Really into them? So much so that you yearn to enter the action transpiring on screen? 

Perhaps you imagine you're a mic tossed around by a thrash rocker, or a perp mercilessly grilled by cops. Maybe you see yourself as a turkey prepped for stuffing by a TV chef.

Those all sound ... fun? Especially that last one. And by "fun," we mean "alarming, bro."

Even so, such scenarios unfold in MullenLowe Singapore's darkly fanciful flight stressing the immersive experience of PRISM+ QUED TV and sound systems.

PRISM+ | Cooking

Yeah, naked turkey guy is the baste. Er, best. (A visual so strange, it drove us to dad humor!)

Acclaimed director Wuthisak "Un" Anarnkaporn from Factory01, supported by post-production teams at TheQuietLab Singapore and Bangkok, delivers something special. These Lynchian excursions are by turns amusing and unsettling in a way western ads rarely are these days. They'll make your skin crawl—just a little, and in a good way. Best of all, they reward repeat viewings, even if you know the punchlines. 

"Each film was intentionally crafted to have a unique visual language and cinematography that's true to the genre," agency senior copywriter Ernest Chin tells Muse. For example, "'Cooking' has that slightly washed-out look, Americana setting and locked cameras that are Martha Stewart-esque."

"Concert," on the other hand, "toggles between different camera angles that you'd find in a live concert recording," Chin says. As for "Drama," the style comes "straight out of a Netflix crime series like Mindhunter, even utilizing the same, familiar aspect ratio and subtitles."

PRISM+ | Concert
PRISM+ | Drama

"Humor is a delicate matter, and too often fumbled in the wrong hands," says MullenLowe ECD Daniel Kee. "We are especially grateful to PRISM+ for taking a chance on expanding their marketing repertoire beyond its influencer-driven efforts. It speaks of a boldly optimistic and growing brand."

In terms of production, "Each film was intentionally crafted to have a unique visual language and cinematography that's true to the genre," agency senior copywriter Ernest Chin tells Muse. For example, "'Cooking' has that slightly washed-out look, Americana setting and locked cameras that are Martha Stewart-esque."

"Concert," on the other hand, "toggles between different camera angles that you'd find in a live concert recording," Chin says. As for "Drama," the style comes "straight out of a Netflix crime series like Mindhunter, even utilizing the same, familiar aspect ratio and subtitles."

For all three, "It took rigorous casting to find the perfect talents for the roles, but we took care to avoid more obvious choices," Chin recalls. "During pre-production, the director went out of his way to cast someone who 'reminded him of a chicken.'"

Hey, close enough. Actor-dude, put that quote on your resume!

The agency and production teams wrote and revised scripts for 30 potential spots to arrive at the final films. 

"The main protagonist in 'Concert' was originally a man," Chin says. "But Khun Un morphed him into a stoic Asian grandmother that most viewers could imagine sitting right in their own living-rooms."

He adds: "It was a dummy. No grandmas were hurt in the making of this film!"

The work drops this week across cinemas, digital and in-store media.

Profile picture for user David Gianatasio
David Gianatasio
David Gianatasio is managing editor at Clio Awards.

Editor's Picks

Advertise With Us

Featured Clio Award Winner

Museletter

SUBSCRIBE

The best in creativity delivered to your inbox every morning.

ADVERTISING